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regular show weed

“Regular Show: It is anything but.”

In one episode, “A Bunch of Full Grown Geese,” the park is plagued by some violent Geese who continue to beat up park workers. Mordecai and Rigby end up enlisting the aid of some baby ducks who morph into a megazord-like fighting robot as they take on the giant conglomerate monster the geese have fused into, a personal favorite episode.
Regular Show can be compared to other cartoon network favorites such as Adventure Time or Dexter’s Laboratory. Now even though this is technically a kids show, the experienced weedist will know you can’t rule anything out right away as potential stoner comedy gold. If nothing else this show will trip you out.

What makes this show so perfect for stoners is that the general plot line of most episodes seems to be pretty, well, regular – until something completely bizarre happens that throws everything into chaos. Mordecai and Rigby are just two normal dudes slacking off at their day job, but their laziness often gets them into absurd metaphysical dilemmas or otherworldly battles for life.
The characters are ridiculous, the plots even more so. Go ahead and grab a bowl and get ready to witness true comical absurdity.
Some examples include “Grilled Cheese Deluxe,” an episode where the duo run an errand to get some grilled cheese sandwiches and end up conning their way into a local space laboratory where an antimatter machine goes haywire and threatens to blow up the town. Or “High Score” where Mordecai and Rigby set the high score on an arcade video game which ends up summoning the previous record holder Garrett Bobby Ferguson, a giant bearded floating head from another world.
See, when watching the Regular Show, the thing is, you can expect anything to happen. No matter how bizarre or irrelevant a plot point might seem, it could end becoming hilariously blown out of proportion in the most ridiculous way, and that’s a good thing for comedy.
J. G. Quintel’s Regular Show is a cartoon that began airing on Cartoon Network in 2010, and has since become quite popular. The show follows the misadventures of Mordecai, a bluejay, and Rigby, a raccoon, as they work as groundskeepers at a community park.

Other main characters in the show include Mordecai and Rigby’s boss and park manager Benson, a walking talking gum ball machine with a volatile temper. Skips, an immortal muscular yeti who seems to know everything about everything. Muscle Man, who is just some green dude that is anything but muscular and finishes every statement with his running “My Mom!” joke (you know who else smokes weed everyday…). Pops, an old time gentleman with a lollipop shaped body who speaks in what one can only assume is supposed to be an old time English dialect, and many others.

Regular Show can be compared to other cartoon network favorites such as Adventure Time or Dexter’s Laboratory. Now even though this is technically a kids show, the experienced weedist will know you can’t rule anything out right away as potential stoner comedy gold.

While Mordecai and Rigby never explicitly smoke, their formulaic “guy messes up, leading to a psychedelic space endeavor” adventures stem from the college projects of the show’s creator, J.G. Quintel, whose own experiences, he’s said, sparked many of the on-screen plots.

Cartoons these days are getting seedy.
By Jack Trainor / Staff Writer
April 20, 2015

Whereas Mordecai and Rigby are limited on “Regular Show” to kid-friendly exclamations like “What the H!” or “How are we gonna fix this S?” the short employs curse words and straightforward drug use as it follows two gas station clerks working the graveyard shift who eat candy laced with acid. Their hallucinations hilariously lead each other to become Mordecai, the blue jay, and Benson, a gumball machine who also became a central character in “Regular Show.”
After watching this short, it’s easy to see where the Emmy Award-winning “Regular Show” came from and the horizon ahead for cartoons. Quintel, who has quickly emerged as Cartoon Network’s next creative juggernaut, has also written for “Adventure Time” and “The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack,” two shows that share “Regular Show’s” reputation for spontaneity and tongue-in-cheek humor.
On the surface, “Regular Show” looks like any other kids’ show. It follows Mordecai, a 20-something blue jay, and his buddy Rigby, a raccoon of the same age, in their work as park groundskeepers.
This recent wave of cartoons has helped define a new generation of television for younger viewers and has connected with older ones by blurring what can and cannot be said.
Mordecai, voiced by Quintel, makes his first appearance in Quintel’s “2 in the AM PM,” while he was still at the California Institute of the Arts in 2006. The animated short is a hand-drawn film that is basically the first-ever episode of “Regular Show,” clearly only made for giggling adolescents. Of the two Quintel short films available on YouTube, “2 in the AM PM” is his only work that definitely could not run on Cartoon Network’s daily rotation, unless it was part of the channel’s late-night “Adult Swim” program.

Millennials can remember spending their childhood Saturday mornings watching beloved, more innocent shows that now only exist in reruns, like “Dexter’s Laboratory,” “Courage the Cowardly Dog” and “The Powerpuff Girls.”

Cartoons these days are getting seedy. Millennials can remember spending their childhood Saturday mornings watching beloved, more innocent shows that now only exist in reruns, like “Dexter’s Laboratory,” “Courage the Cowardly Dog” and “The Powerpuff Girls.” The audience for the newest crop of cartoons, however, is hazier than that of its predecessors. The bizarre, short…

“Regular Show: It is anything but.” In one episode, “A Bunch of Full Grown Geese,” the park is plagued by some violent Geese who continue to beat up park