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smoking weed before wisdom teeth removal

HelloMD

“Do you know how long I should wait, or what would be the best way for me to smoke without getting dry sockets? I’m only slightly swollen today and off painkillers. Also, if I smoke before the operation to calm my nerves, will it affect the anesthesia?”

I know from experience that wisdom teeth removal can be a painful experience! Great care must be taken with oral hygiene to aide the healing process and to avoid the “dry sockets” you mentioned. Be careful with alcohol based tinctures (they can be irritating), and with anything you put into your mouth during the healing process. The “cotton-mouth” that many people experience with cannabis may also have some detrimental effects, so be sure to maintain an adequate moisture level in your mouth. I might suggest using a vaporizer (with pursed lips you should be able to avoid excessive vapor coming into contact with the healing tissue), or an infused honey, or easily ingested liquid/drink. Although not yet a reality, cannabis may soon be administered as a vapor through a nasal canula.

My husband just had 1 of his wisdom teeth pulled and he used 1/4 (12.5mg) of the Trokie CBD 50mg lozenge, once or twice a day. He placed a 1/4 of the lozenge between his upper gums and cheek (called buccal absorption) where the tooth was pulled. Not only did the pain melt away in about 30 minutes, but the CBD also has a natural numbing effect. The buccal absorption allows for most of the medicine to get absorbed right into the blood stream, missing the first pass metabolism of the Liver, so you end up getting more of the active ingredient CBD.

I think it would help you greatly but to stop pain and calm your fear. You should start ahead of time if possible but if not possible use a vape pen of AC/DC, Harlequin or Cannatonic. Why do we have pain, anxiety and fear? Because we imagine the worst, so stop that. Let your wisdom teeth go, don’t fight to hold them in, imagine that your teeth are sitting in soft butter and they slide right out. If you think a little buzz will help you be sure to have someone drive you to and from the dental office and use a CBD: THC @ 2:1 OR 1:1. You might be on larger doses of CBD at bedtime just stop all the inflammation and support your immune system and calm your fears. Don’t imagine the worst, Imagine that you made it through in five minutes and everything went perfect and easy and I likely will happen that way. Do not mentally resist the procedure but if you realize that you are resisting maybe you shouldn’t have it done. Any time we resist what our body is trying to communicate to us we will experience more anxiety, which leads to fear, which translates to pain. Have that talk with yourself, do you really want to have this done? If is yes, be happy you’re having it done and let it occur easily. You have much more control than you know but do not do high doses of THC like Sativa because you can flip yourself out with anxiety on Sativa or hi THC. Stick with CBD since it will help stop pain, inflammation & anxiety.

The general rules is to wait at least five days after your procedure. Patients undergoing oral surgery are advised to avoid smoking (whether of cigarettes or cannabis) because the sucking action can dislodge the blood clot that forms over the surgery site and lead to dry socket. Dry socket is an infection that can occur in the empty tooth socket, leaving the the nerve and bone exposed to air, food, and bacteria in your mouth. It is extremely painful (I experienced it firsthand and can attest to this!) and typically involves an emergency trip to your oral surgeon to have the site flushed, and then a course of antibiotics, and prescription pain killers as needed. Smoking also decreases blood flow to the gums, which slows the healing process.

Finally, the dry mouth you experience when smoking cannabis is something that negatively impacts your gum health. A recent study in New Zealand examined habitual cannabis smokers over a 20 year period and found that the one risk of this behavior was an increased rate of gum disease, regardless of hygiene, and other socio-demographic factors. Researchers believe that one reason for this is the lack of saliva to flush out bacteria from the gum tissues. When you do resume smoking cannabis after your post-surgical hiatus, make sure you are drinking lots of fluids to compensate for decreased saliva production.

Hi! I recently had my upper wisdom teeth removed and I was very honest with my dentist regarding my cannabis consumption.

He informed me that healing time varies by each patient, but typically you want to avoid smoking (cannabis or tobacco) from 7-14 days to prevent bacteria or opening of the wounds. It is also important to keep your mouth moisturized to prevent dry sockets, so avoid smoking to prevent “cotton mouth”!

My dentist also informed me that alternatives to smoking cannabis – edibles, patches, and tinctures – should not impact the healing process. Transdermal patches can be used for pain relief and are not consumed orally. Tinctures can be easily ingested by placing a few drops under your tongue. Personally, to tame my wisdom teeth pain, I found relief with drinkable edibles! Smoking is my preferred method of marijuana consumption, but to avoid issues with my extraction, I would enjoy cannabis-infused lemonade in the day, and cannabis tea in the evening to help me sleep. If you decide to use edibles, you’ll want to avoid anything hard or sticky, as chewing will be difficult for the first week or so. That said, if you decide to use an edible or tincture after wisdom teeth removal, make sure you remember to rinse your mouth with warm water and salt to prevent an infection.

As for consuming cannabis PRIOR to your wisdom teeth surgery, please avoid smoking as increased production of stupum could occur making your surgery more difficult.

Hope this information helps!

This is a very good question! Due to the seriousness of the situation, it is best to be cautious when combining any cannabinoid with local anesthesia. Definitely consult a doctor! There are a few articles online that talk about cannabis building a tolerance to anesthesia for a patient, not something you want happening during surgery. While established practices for cannabis and general anesthesia are not in place yet, other people have asked similar questions. Take a look here

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"Do you know how long I should wait, or what would be the best way for me to smoke without getting dry sockets? I'm only…

If you smoke pot, your anesthesiologist needs to know

When Colorado legalized marijuana, it became a pioneer in creating new policies to deal with the drug.

Now the state’s surgeons, nurses and anesthesiologists are becoming pioneers of a different sort in understanding what weed may do to patients who go under the knife.

Their observations and initial research show that marijuana use may affect patients’ responses to anesthesia on the operating table — and, depending on the patient’s history of using the drug, either help or hinder their symptoms afterward in the recovery room.

Growing number of pregnant women using marijuana

Colorado makes for an interesting laboratory. Since the state legalized marijuana for medicine in 2000 and allowed for its recreational sale in 2014, more Coloradans are using it — and they may also be more willing to tell their doctors about it.

Roughly 17 percent of Coloradans said they used marijuana in the previous 30 days in 2017, according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, more than double the 8 percent who reported doing so in 2006. By comparison, just 9 percent of U.S. residents said they used marijuana in 2017.

“It has been destigmatized here in Colorado,” said Dr. Andrew Monte, an associate professor of emergency medicine and medical toxicology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and UCHealth. “We’re ahead of the game in terms of our ability to talk to patients about it. We’re also ahead of the game in identifying complications associated with use.”

One small study of Colorado patients published in May found marijuana users required more than triple the amount of one common sedation medicine, propofol, as did nonusers.

Those findings and anecdotal reports are prompting additional questions from the study’s author, Dr. Mark Twardowski, and others in the state’s medical field: If pot users indeed need more anesthesia, are there increased risks for breathing problems during minor procedures? Are there higher costs with the use of more medication, if a second or third bottle of anesthesia must be routinely opened? And what does regular cannabis use mean for recovery post-surgery?

But much is still unknown about marijuana’s impact on patients because it remains illegal on the federal level, making studies difficult to fund or undertake.

It’s even difficult to quantify how many of the estimated 800,000 to 1 million anesthesia procedures that are performed in Colorado each year involve marijuana users, according to Dr. Joy Hawkins, a professor of anesthesiology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and president of the Colorado Society of Anesthesiologists. The Colorado Hospital Association said it doesn’t track anesthesia needs or costs specific to marijuana users.

As more states legalize cannabis to varying degrees, discussions about the drug are happening elsewhere, too. On a national level, the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists recently updated its clinical guidelines to highlight potential risks for and needs of marijuana users. American Society of Anesthesiologists spokeswoman Theresa Hill said that the use of marijuana in managing pain is a topic under discussion but that more research is needed. This year, it endorsed a federal bill calling for fewer regulatory barriers on marijuana research.

Why should patients disclose marijuana use?

No matter where patients live, though, many nurses and doctors from around the country agree: Patients should disclose marijuana use before any surgery or procedure. Linda Stone, a certified registered nurse anesthetist in Raleigh, N.C., acknowledged that patients in states where marijuana is illegal might be more hesitant.

“We really don’t want patients to feel like there’s stigma. They really do need to divulge that information,” Stone said. “We are just trying to make sure that we provide the safest care.”

In Colorado, Hawkins said, anesthesiologists have noticed that patients who use marijuana are more tolerant of some common anesthesia drugs, such as propofol, which helps people fall asleep during general anesthesia or stay relaxed during conscious “twilight” sedation. But higher doses can increase potentially serious side effects such as low blood pressure and depressed heart function.

We are just trying to make sure that we provide the safest care.

Limited airway flow is another issue for people who smoke marijuana. “It acts very much like cigarettes, so it makes your airway irritated,” she said.

To be sure, anesthesia must be adjusted to accommodate patients of all sorts, apart from cannabis use. Anesthesiologists are prepared to adapt and make procedures safe for all patients, Hawkins said. And in some emergency surgeries, patients might not be in a position to disclose their cannabis use ahead of time.

Even when they do, a big challenge for medical professionals is gauging the amounts of marijuana consumed, as the potency varies widely from one joint to the next or when ingested through marijuana edibles. And levels of THC, the chemical with psychoactive effects in marijuana, have been increasing in the past few decades.

“For marijuana, it’s a bit of the Wild West,” Hawkins said. “We just don’t know what’s in these products that they’re using.”

Marijuana’s effects on pain after surgery

Colorado health providers are also observing how marijuana changes patients’ symptoms after they leave the operating suite — particularly relevant amid the ongoing opioid epidemic.

“We’ve been hearing reports about patients using cannabis, instead of opioids, to treat their postoperative pain,” said Dr. Mark Steven Wallace, chair of the pain medicine division in the anesthesiology department at the University of California-San Diego, in a state that also has legalized marijuana. “I have a lot of patients who say they prefer it.”

Matthew Sheahan, 25, of Denver, said he used marijuana to relieve pain after the removal of his wisdom teeth four years ago. After surgery, he smoked marijuana rather than using the ibuprofen prescribed but didn’t disclose this to his doctor because pot was illegal in Ohio, where he had the procedure. He said his doctor told him his swelling was greatly reduced. “I didn’t experience the pain that I thought I would,” Sheahan said.

Colorado is on the front lines in dealing with how marijuana use affects surgery. Lessons from surgeons and anesthesiologists have prompted calls for more research on marijuana nationwide. ]]>