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What Causes a Burning Sensation in Your Nose?

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Is this cause for concern?

Oftentimes, a burning sensation in your nostrils is the result of irritation in your nasal passages. Depending on the time of year, this could be due to dryness in the air or allergic rhinitis. Infections, chemical irritants, and medications like nasal spray can also irritate the sensitive lining of your nose.

Read on to learn what might be causing the burning sensation in your nose and how to treat it.

During the winter months, the air outside is much drier than it is in the summertime. Indoor heating systems add to the problem by pouring out hot, dry air.

The dryness in the air makes moisture in your body quickly evaporate. That’s why your hands and lips crack, and your mouth feels parched during the cold months.

Winter air can also leech moisture from the mucous membranes inside your nose, leaving your nose dry and irritated. Raw nasal passages are why some people get frequent nosebleeds during the winter.

What you can do

One way to add moisture to the air is to install a humidifier in your house, or turn on a cool-mist vaporizer — especially when you sleep. Just be sure to keep the overall humidity in your house set below 50 percent. Any higher and you can encourage the growth of mold, which can also irritate your sensitive nose.

Use an over-the-counter (OTC) hydrating nasal spray to replenish parched nasal passages. And when you go outside, cover your nose with a scarf to prevent any remaining moisture in your nose from drying up.

Better known as hay fever, allergic rhinitis is the itchy, irritated nose, sneezing, and stuffiness you get after being exposed to an allergy trigger.

When mold, dust, or pet dander makes its way into your nose, your body releases chemicals like histamine, which sets off the allergic reaction.

This reaction irritates your nasal passages and causes symptoms like:

  • itchy nose, mouth, eyes, throat, or skin
  • sneezing
  • cough
  • swollen eyelids

Between 40 to 60 million Americans have allergic rhinitis. In some people, it only pops up seasonally. For others, it’s a year-round affliction.

What you can do

One of the most effective ways to deal with allergies is to avoid exposure to your triggers.

  • Keep your windows closed with the air conditioner turned on during peak allergy season. If you have to garden or mow the lawn, wear a mask to keep pollen out of your nose.
  • Wash your bedding in hot water and vacuum your rugs and upholstery. Put a dust-mite-proof cover on your bed to keep these tiny bugs away.
  • Keep pets out of your bedroom. Wash your hands after you touch them —especially before touching your nose.

Ask your doctor about trying one or more of these nasal allergy treatments:

  • Nasal antihistamine spray can help counter the effects of the allergic reaction.
  • Nasal decongestant and steroid sprays help bring down swelling in your nose.
  • Nasal saline spray or irrigation (neti pot) can remove any dried-up crust from inside your nose.

A sinus infection (sinusitis) can feel a lot like a cold. Both conditions have symptoms like a stuffy nose, headache, and runny nose in common. But unlike a cold, which is caused by a virus, bacteria cause a sinus infection.

When you have a sinus infection, mucus becomes stuck in the air-filled spaces behind your nose, forehead, and cheeks. Bacteria can grow in the trapped mucus, causing an infection.

You’ll feel the pain and pressure of a sinus infection in the bridge of your nose, as well as behind your cheeks and forehead.

Other symptoms include:

  • green discharge from your nose
  • postnasal drip
  • stuffed nose
  • headache
  • fever
  • sore throat
  • coughing
  • fatigue
  • bad breath

What you can do

If you’ve had symptoms of a sinus infection and they’ve lasted for more than a week, see your doctor. You can take antibiotics to kill the bacteria that caused the infection, but you should only use them if your doctor confirms that you do have a bacterial infection. Antibiotics won’t work on viral illnesses like the common cold.

Nasal decongestant, antihistamine, and steroid sprays can help shrink swollen nasal passages. You can also use a saline wash daily to rinse out any crust that’s formed inside your nostrils.

Depending on the season, the burning sensation in your nose could be from the air or allergies. Here's how to identify your symptoms and find relief.

How to inhale weed without going overboard

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Contents

  1. How to inhale weed properly
  2. How to avoid inhaling too much

Every stoner begins as a novice and learning how to inhale weed is the first step of every toker’s journey. Since breathing is a natural process that occurs thousands of times per day, it’s strange to contemplate “how to inhale.” Nevertheless, all first-time smokers start somewhere, and proper breathing technique is essential to maximizing the cannabis experience.

A proper breathing technique is essential to maximizing the cannabis experience. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Most first-timers hit their joint like they’re smoking a cigarette without actually breathing the smoke into their lungs. If the smoke isn’t fully inhaled into the lungs, it only travels into the throat and nasal passages, which absorb THC, thus wasting precious cannabinoids. This is why many first-time tokers fail to get high.

Read on to learn how to avoid coughing and choking while making the most of every cannabis hit.

How to inhale weed properly

Proper inhalation techniques stem from the same basic principles and vary slightly depending on whether you’re smoking a joint, hitting a bong, or using a vaporizer.

When smoking, you’re burning cannabis to the point of combustion and inhaling the smoke to deliver cannabinoids into your bloodstream. Smoking can be painful for lungs, so it’s important to take slow, measured draws to minimize irritation. Start with shallow inhalations and draw more deeply as you progress and become more comfortable.

Here’s a handy technique to ensure your lungs absorb the maximum amount of THC: slowly inhale about two-thirds of your hit and follow up with a deep, inhaled gulp of air. The fresh air pushes the cannabis smoke down into the lungs and should improve THC’s absorption. There’s no need to hold your inhale for long. THC and other cannabinoids may act as bronchodilators, which means they increase airflow, speeding absorption.

Slowly inhale about two-thirds of your hit and follow up with a deep, inhaled gulp of air. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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After your first toke, consider waiting 5-10 minutes to observe the onset of effects and then deciding whether you need more.

How to avoid inhaling too much

Some cannabis consumption methods are more harsh than others. Blunts and spliffs include tobacco, which damages the lungs. Joints and pipes, which contain cannabis only, may be less harmful. Similarly, smoking marijuana out of a bong or bubbler cools the otherwise harsh cannabis smoke by filtering it through water.

Smoking marijuana out of a bong or bubbler cools the otherwise harsh cannabis smoke by filtering it through water. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Start slow as you pull through your pipe or bong, gulping a breath of fresh air after you clear the chamber. The gulp helps you absorb the THC fully. You can always take deeper hits as you become more comfortable and understand how to control your dose.

Vaporizing weed is less harsh on the lungs than smoke, but many cannabis consumers report a more intense high with this method. Cannabis vaporizes at a much lower temperature than its burning point, thus preserving the cannabinoids and terpenes otherwise lost in combustion.

Vaporizing weed is less harsh on the lungs than smoke. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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When vaping cannabis, whether in oil or flower form, it’s better to take shallower hits and hold them for slightly less time than you would hold cannabis smoke. Take time between hits to assess how you feel and decide whether you’d like to consume more.

How to inhale weed without going overboard Copy article link to clipboard. Link copied to clipboard. Contents How to inhale weed properly How to avoid inhaling too much